In search of the best fusion food

I am a modern girl. I love food and trying out new things which is why fusion food is my favourite type of food. It is traditional yet creative and often produces mind blowing results. So you get the tradition food you love with an amazing twist.

What follows is just one of the restaurants I have found that serve the most incredible fusion food.

  •  Wasabi
  • Fusion Type: Asian
  • Location: Croydon
  • Price Range: Fine dining

One word incredible. Think amazing dishes, impeccable service, great ambience and wonderful management. As a restaurant reviewer I have to notice the  little things about a location and look for bad things. I can honestly say I found nothing.

The restaurant is known for its stunning sushi creations which can be found nowhere else. Try the Tempura Roses or the New Era for the vegetarians. Ask your waiter what he suggests, they are incredibly knowledgeable and have tablets to show off pictures of the sushi creations.

They also specialise in Dim Sum. For those of you who don’t know Dim Sum is a style of Cantonese food prepared as small bite-sized or individual portions of food traditionally served in small steamer baskets or on small plates.

For the more traditional palates try the Peking duck or the Sizzling Beef. Massive portions, great taste and elegantly plated.

You have to try one of their dessert cakes, it is heaven. Sit in the cigar lounge and enjoy the ambience. Or sit outside and smoke guilt free while being surrounded by nature.

Wasabi is set to become one of the hottest restaurants in Johannesburg so get there soon!

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Bounce Bounce Bounce

One of the perks of my hobby as a freelance writer for Trendfrenzy magazine is I get to go to awesome events that case the best of South Africa.

On Thursday I was invited to the exclusive VIP launch of Bounce South Africa. This is a first in South Africa and is going to be an awesome addition to the Joburg activities scene.

Bounce is a worldwide franchise of trampoline parks. In America, where the concept came from, many trampoline parks were old, dirty and unsafe. So the owner of the franchise decided to make a trampoline park that was big, bright, airy and full of competent friendly staff. Thus Bounce was born.

The South African version is situated in the Waterfalls lifestyle centre, on the corner of Woodmead and Maxwell Drive. This massive venue has over 28 interconnected trampolines and different activity areas.  Each area has one or  dedicated referrers who explain the rules, give you a high 5 and keep a watchful eye on all jumpers.

The bag area

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Dunk some hoops!

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The high performance area – these tramps are extra bouncy!

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These are just a few of the pics 🙂

Each session is an hour long and when you pay for entrance you get your very own bounce socks to keep. No sharing! Prices range from R140 and up. There are various different packages for parties, children and even corporates. Booking online saves you the hassle but you can walk in any time too.

Read more about my review in the June edition of Trend frenzy(out soon)!

So go get your bounce on!

In honour of Africa Day…

In honour of Africa Day 2015 today I am going to post a passage that talks about 2 pivotal things in my life:

– my love of this beautiful continent I live on

– September 2011, which was what made me realise what career I wanted to follow

Enjoy!

“I feel to that the gap between my new life in New York and the situation at home in Africa is stretching into a gulf, as Zimbabwe spirals downwards into a violent dictatorship. My head bulges with the effort to contain both worlds. When I am back in New York, Africa immediately seems fantastical – a wildly plumaged bird, as exotic as it is unlikely.

Most of us struggle in life to maintain the illusion of control, but in Africa that illusion is almost impossible to maintain. I always have the sense there that there is no equilibrium, that everything perpetually teeters on the brink of some dramatic change, that society constantly stands poised for some spasm, some tsunami in which you can do nothing but hope to bob up to the surface and not be sucked out into a dark and hungry sea. The origin of my permanent sense of unease, my general foreboding, is probably the fact that I have lived through just such change, such a sudden and violent upending of value systems.

In my part of Africa, death is never far away. With more Zimbabweans dying in their early thirties now, mortality has a seat at every table. The urgent, tugging winds themselves seem to whisper the message, memento mori, you too shall die. In Africa, you do not view death from the auditorium of life, as a spectator, but from the edge of the stage, waiting only for your cue. You feel perishable, temporary, transient. You feel mortal.

Maybe that is why you seem to live more vividly in Africa. The drama of life there is amplified by its constant proximity to death. That’s what infuses it with tension. It is the essence of its tragedy too. People love harder there. Love is the way that life forgets that it is terminal. Love is life’s alibi in the face of death.

For me, the illusion of control is much easier to maintain in England or America. In this temperate world, I feel more secure, as if change will only happen incrementally, in manageable, finely calibrated, bite-sized portions. There is a sense of continuity threaded through it all: the anchor of history, the tangible presence of antiquity, of buildings, of institutions. You live in the expectation of reaching old age.

At least you used to.

But on Tuesday, September 11, 2001, those two states of mind converge. Suddenly it feels like I am back in Africa, where things can be taken away from you at random, in a single violent stroke, as quick as the whip of a snake’s head. Where tumult is raised with an abruptness that is as breathtaking as the violence itself. ”
― Peter Godwin, When a Crocodile Eats the Sun: A Memoir of Africa

Being Grateful for the small things

Today I am grateful for my mother who enabled me to get an education.

My mom and I have never had money.Sure, we have never been destitute but there has never been money for luxuries. That is half the reason why I started working when I was 16.

My mom’s only goal was to educate me. For 3 years we both worked hard, scrimped and saved and here I am, with my second degree, an Honors degree in International Politics. She always placed such an emphasis on education that even though now I have got 2 degree’s I still want go on and complete my Masters degree and eventually one day my Doctorate.

 

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So many women and men are denied an education when that is all they want. If you think about it, the man who could find the cure to cancer is sitting somewhere right now dreaming of an education. The person who could negotiate peace talks and make the world a better place is crying right now because she wants to go to school but can’t because of religious laws and centuries of sexist thinking. While rich kids all over the world get given world class education opportunities and squander it away, spending all their time on partying and not realising what they have been given.

My mum is my rock. Without her, I would be lost. We get on so well we are more like best friends than mother and daughter.

Something to Help you Suffer

May my suffering be of service….

This is a profound sentence. I found it when I was really upset and suffering. I had wanted something so badly and it would have changed my life. I didn’t get it. It unleashed a world of emotions in me. But the main thought that came to my head was ” I am not good enough “.

I found this mantra/sentence/thought and it made me feel better. I am resilient. I always have been. My life hasn’t been easy but compared to some peoples lives it has been a dream. It is all relative I guess. I always have a plan B and I bounce back quickly.

This time not so much. Until I read that line.

suffering

The idea behind is that your suffering now will be of service to someone in the future. So no matter what you are going through or how you are suffering one day you will be able to help someone. It almost made my pain enjoyable if that makes sense. I am a humanist and I love helping people. I can’t bear to see people suffer and I want to dedicate my life to that (read more about that later).

Read more about here.

So next time you are suffering and in pain repeat “may my suffering be of service” and see how it makes you feel.

Trendfrenzy’s April Issue out NOW!

April’s Issue

So the April issue of Trendfrenzy is out. Check it out here!

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Just in case you were wondering I wrote a couple of features this month: the Bucket List Feature, the Chef’s on Decks article, the Beer Trends of 2015, and few more.

Go check it out. The magazine is filled with awesome stories and features.

While you are there maybe pop over to our FB page and see what’s happening on there! We post lots of other content on our social media platforms as well as some amazing competitions.

Till next time!

SA Fashion Week 2015

Last week I stepped out of the IT circle and into the infamous fashion world.648x374xEC-Fashion-Week-experience-Sep2014-offer-Feature-Images.jpg.pagespeed.ic_.bm8sP6nHSp

I write for an online magazine  and the editor Carla Galinos and I got invited to the SA Fashion Week. As we were invited to view one of the shows on Friday night we could both go and we excitley rsvp’d yes.

SA Fashion Week is amazing. All the styles from all over Johannesburg and some interntational cities get together in a cultural melting pot to discuss, watch and live fashion. It was held at the Crown Plaza Hotel in the posh district of Rosebank in Johannesburg. The hotel was beautiful with amazing decor.

hotel-lobby

As guests of the designer Karolina Olowsdotter who was affiliated with City Varsity we were treated with Rimmel goodie bags and Cruz Vodka in tiny little cocktails. We were also given a glossy magazine about SA Fashion Week. We had a great vantage point of the run way and saw 3 collections by 3 different designers: Ere, Wake, Lalesso and of course Olowsdotter.

The clothes were all very different from each other, and the music was dark, with a lot of base. One of the tracks I remember was a song by the Gorillaz, Fire Coming Out of a Monkeys Head.The runway was flat and white with long hanging stick lights in the middle of the runway. My descriptions leave much to be desired but please see the pictures in the magazine.

If you want to read more about Karolina Olowsdotter check out our March edition here out on the 8th of April.lookbookcdfoldout7

Going to the fashion show was definitely an experience. I saw weird and wonderful fashions, interesting things, clothes my gran would wear and clothes I would kill for. I saw people tweeting furiously and cameras going off at milisecond intervals.

In other words I saw fashion.

Manhattan’s Beautiful Design

In 1811 a street plan was adopted for the island of Manhattan that allowed the sun to set directly on the line of the streets twice a year. The cross-street grid was approved by the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811 to be offset from true east-west by 29 degrees to allow this to happen.

The effect is spectacular. It has also been described as unique, because the tall buildings of Manhattan create a canyon effect heightened by the un-interrupted views across the Hudson River towards New Jersey.

For 2013 the effect will occur on May 28th and July 13th. On those days the setting Sun will align with Manhattan’s street grid creating a sunset glow directly down each cross street.

John Randel Jr. (1787–1865) was the surveyor who created Manhattan’s grid over what was an undeveloped, hilly island. Randel was a believer in the Enlightenment, new theories, which gave math and science a new role in human affairs.

Randell was most probably a Freemason too, as they were holders of many high offices in the US during the early years after independence.

Manhattan’s street grid is at its most beautiful when the streets align directly with the setting sun. Whether future historians interpret this to mean New Yorker’s worship the sun is another matter entirely.

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** This is a reblogged post. This is not my writing.